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“You Can’t Save the World”–Finnish Translation by Jasmin Fosse

 

You can’t save the world–here’s what we can do | Casey Lartigue Jr & Eunkoo Lee | TEDxDongdaemun (Finnish Subtitles)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFaXvG-rSmQ&list=PL-6_xImxyTAJw3qeFJBXFv6fSCFEOb9eG&index=1

Eunkoo: Minä olin väärässä. Suurin osa ihmisistä ei halua myöntää, kun he ovat väärässä, mutta minua ei haitannut, koska tässä tapauksessa se näytti minulle valinnan merkityksen. Ennen kuin selitän, mistä minä olin väärässä, haluaisin jakaa yhden monista lausunnoista, jotka muuttivat minun ajattelua.

Eunhee Park, yksi 300:sta pohjoiskorealaisista pakolaisista, jonka kanssa olemme työskennelleet viimeisten neljän vuoden aikana, sanoi: “Elämäni muuttui TNKR:n ansiosta ja avasi minulle täysin uuden maailman. Minua ennen hävetti kertoa ihmisille, että olen pohjoiskorealainen, mutta nyt minulla on luottamusta olla piilottamatta minun kasvojani ja minun nimeäni. Joka päivä olen kiitollinen Caseylle ja Eunkoolle siitä, että he auttoivat minua kasvattamaan luottamusta itseeni.” Read more

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2017-12-22 former Psychological Warfare Officer in NK visits TNKR

That’s right, Jang Jinsung dropped by the TNKR office on Friday. When he was in North Korea, his job was to spread propaganda in South Korea. He did his job so well that he was named a favorite Poet Propagandist of Kim Jong-Il. He later escaped to South Korea, he has written several books including Dear Leader. He is one of the refugees connected with TNKR who has agreed to sign books as part of TNKR’s Book Club. He is now on TNKR’s Board of Directors, the first time he has served on a board of directors. He has governments and strategists about North Korea around the world seeking his advice, so we are honored that he is such a fan of our humble organization. Here’s his interview with TNKR last year, in English and Korean. He is one of the refugees who has issued strong public testimonials on our behalf.

 

Jang Jinsung signing a couple of copies of his book for TNKR donors.

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Anyone have time to read this?

Years ago I read an article about a man who kept track of every detail of his life. The result is that he had boxes and boxes of diaries documenting every little detail. My question when I read the article: How in the world can he get anything done if he is busy writing every moment about what he is doing?
 
Few people have read his diaries and I don’t even remember his name now. That’s not surprising. After all, who wants to read about a guy using the bathroom at 7:40 am, then making a phone call 15 minutes later at 7:55, then checking the mail at 8:05, stubbing his foot in the door at 8:07, looking at the dog barking across at the street at 8:10 after he slammed his hand in the door as he was daydreaming about recording in his diary the exciting events of the past 30 minutes? 
 
Sometimes I fall behind in posting things about TNKR–because we are too busy DOING them. Here’s a wrap-up of some our recent activities. Clearly I’m smarter than the guy keeping all of those diaries. Instead of writing every detail, I take photos. But then, who in the world wants to look at all of our photos?
 
In this post:
Feedback and interviews with refugees
Youngmin Kwon, TNKR Academic Adviser
Interviews about TNKR
Visitors to TNKR
Leaving the TNKR Cave
TNKR Team
Not in this post:
Matching session on December 9
Orientation on December 10
Bring My Father Home Press Conference
…and other stuff I can’t remember or no one took photos…
 
FEEDBACK
 
When refugees first join TNKR, Eunkoo Lee and I conduct separate interviews. We do this as an initial session before the orientation to get to know the refugees a bit, to make sure they understand that this is a low-budget self-study program, to lower their expectations, to make sure we have an understanding of why they are joining TNKR, and to make sure they are thinking ahead about how to use TNKR well.
 
So many are overjoyed–some want to take photos with us because they have heard about TNKR. Others are thankful they finally have a chance to study with us. The initial interviews are always great. The refugees who have come in recently range from recently arrivals referred to us by other refugees or government agencies to refugees who have been here for a decade or more but have failed to learn English. Too many wonderful and sad stories, but my conclusion: North Korea is a screwed up country that unnecessarily keeps many of its people ignorant about the world and then cruelly punishes those who seek to escape to the outside world.
 

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2017-11-25 14th KOTESOL DCC Symposium and Thanksgiving Dinner

Thanks so much to Kotesol: Daejeon-Chungcheong Chapter for inviting TNKR to present at its annual symposium and Thanksgiving Dinner. Eunkoo Lee and I presented as the featured speakers at the Plenary session. Thanks so much to Mike Peacock, DCC Chapter President, for making it happen. I’m just sorry that because of our tight schedule that we couldn’t join earlier in the day.


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2017-11-26 TNKR Matching 66: Sitting-room only!

On Sunday 2017-11-26, Teach North Korean Refugees (TNKR) just held its largest ever Language Matching session: 10 refugee students, 21 tutors, 1 South Korean student. Instead of standing-room only, it was sitting room only. During the week, we were on pace for a somewhat typical large session, with 16 tutors and 9 refugees signed up. Eunkoo Lee hasn’t checked recently, but we probably have more than 70 refugees on the waiting list to join the program. And with refugees saying at the orientation that they wanted to select several tutors, we decided to hold an emergency orientation session to accept five more tutors.

The question became: What if everyone shows up? We have been on a hot streak recently, with every tutor showing up. We could expand because Janice Kim has taken over as Manager of Track 1. In the past, 15 tutors was all that I could handle alone, in addition to my other many duties for TNKR, and I greatly regretted the time that we had 19 tutors at a session. It isn’t just the session, but the follow up when some tutors disappear knowing I can’t chase them all. Whereas I tend to be grumpy in teaching applicants how to fill out the resume, Janice is delightful, patient.

So we decided to have our biggest session. We only have 22 chairs, so if your figuring ain’t bad, you can guess that about 35 people (including staff) were going to have trouble squeezing into 22 chairs. So we made the decision to move all of the chairs out of the room, and to have everyone sit on the floor, like we were back in elementary school.

Support TNKRhttp://teachnorthkoreanrefugees.org/donate/

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2017-11-26 Five hours early!

(TNKR) Teach North Korean Refugees Language Matching session #66 will be held today from 2 p.m. Students get to choose tutors based on when they arrive to our office, first come, first choose.
As of this morning, we have a new record: 9:20 a.m.
Yes, she arrived almost 5 hours early.
I occasionally have some experts, mainly South Koreans, telling me refugees are passive. My response, as I have been saying since I was a grad student at Harvard, and said when I helped create a school voucher program for low-income parents in Washington DC, have been saying to education experts I encounter, and said again in my TEDx Talk recently: If the people who benefit from your program or activity are passive, then it means you didn’t design it well.
I can’t account for all 30,000 NK refugees who have escaped to South Korea in the last 20 years, but the ones who find us are certainly motivated.
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2017-11-13 Special Project with Special Lady named Sharon

I first met Sharon Jang in early 2015. She has remained with TNKR constantly since then. Every meeting with her is lovely and inspiring. We are now working with her on a special project, it is all hands on deck with our staff in the office as well as a volunteer in the USA.

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2017-10-12 Congratulations, lovely Sharon!

We joined lovely Sharon Jang as the results were announced in an essay test. We were so delighted that she mentioned the impact TNKR has had on her!

She first joined TNKR in early 2015. Her English was at a basic level, she joined both Tracks 1 and 2. She had no fear. And if you know her story about working in a coal mine in North Korea, then you can understand why the thought of giving public speeches gave her no fear.

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2017-10-10 TNKR’s British Invasion

TNKR held its second planning meeting for its trip to the UK next week. We had many tasks assigned and have a lot to do.

Our biggest challenge: Attracting attendees to our 10/21 forum.

Here’s the agenda:

1:50- 2:05 Registration & tea time

2:05- 2:10 Welcoming remarks

Casey Lartigue Jr. (TNKR Co-founder)

Jihyun Park (Stepping Stones, Co-founder)

2:10-2:30 The Launch Ceremony of Stepping Stones

2:30-3:00 North Korean traditional dance performance

3:00-3:10 Tea time

3:10-3:25 Speaker 1

Kim Hyeong-soo: Understanding the North Korean System

3:25-3:45 Speaker 2

Park Ji-hyun: Life as a North Korean Woman in China

3:45-4:10 Speakers 3&4

Casey Lartigue & Eunkoo Lee: Impact of English education for North Korean refugees

4:10-5:00

Q & A

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